While there is no single cause of violence against women, research and evidence tells us that the key drivers of violence against women are gender inequality, gender stereotyping and a broader culture of violence.

Importantly, we’re starting to talk about the extent to which this violence is rooted in entrenched patterns of gender inequality, which in turn have seen women and children poorly served by the media, police, judicial system and religious institutions.

Studies show Australians are more likely to excuse abusive behaviour than twenty years ago, calling temporary anger and yelling abuse normal while shrugging off the seriousness of someone controlling household finances to punish their partner. This is why men have a vital role to play in ending violence against women and their children. There are a number of organisations working to foster and encourage male leadership in this space, and to increase awareness and change attitudes by promoting respectful and nonviolent relationships between all people.

But we need more avenues for men to speak out against violence against women, and to safely and effectively challenge the attitudes and behaviours of a minority of men who use or condone violence against women.

For more info see Our Watch: Myths About Violence