INFOGRAPHIC

1 in 5 Australian women had experienced sexual violence; 1 in 22 Australian men had experienced sexual violence.

 

1 in 4 Australian women had experienced physical or sexual violence from a current or former partner; 1 in 19 Australian men had experienced physical or sexual violence from a current or former partner.

 

1 in 4 Australian women had experienced emotional abuse by a current or former partner; 1 in 7 Australian men had experienced emotional abuse by a current or former partner.

 

In Australia, men and women both experience violence. However, the location of where the violence takes place, the severity and the relationship of the perpetrator to the victim is often vastly different. Men are more likely to experience violence in public; women are more likely to experience violence within their intimate relationships and homes.

 

Use Victims of Violence graph

https://www.theguardian.com/society/datablog/2015/oct/22/one-in-four-women-has-experienced-domestic-violence-at-partners-hands

 

Intimate partner violence contributes to more death, disability and illness in women aged 15 to 44 than any other preventable factor: 103 women were killed in FDV–related Homicides in 2015, which accounts for two-thirds of victims.

 

Further, domestic or family violence is the most significant factor in homelessness for women and the combined health, administration and social welfare costs of violence against women have been estimated to be $21.7 billion a year, with projections suggesting that if If no further action is taken to prevent violence against women, costs will accumulate to $323.4 billion over a thirty year period from 2014-15 to 2044-45.

 

In the 2015, the Australian Bureau of Statistics reported that females were more likely than males to be victims of domestic and family violence (FDV) across Australia. The state and territory specific statistical data is as follows: 

  • In New South Wales, there were twice as many female victims (20,338 victims) as male victims (10,104) of FDV–related Assault. Females were four times more likely to be the victim of Assault within an intimate partner relationship (13,124 victims), when compared to males (3,419 victims). 
  • In South Australia, there were three times as many female victims of FDV–related Assault (5,926 victims) compared to males (1,815 victims). Females were almost six times more likely (4,490 victims) than males (816 victims) to have experienced victimisation within an intimate partner relationship. 
  • In Western Australia, females were three times (13,291 victims) more likely than males (4,858 victims) to have been a victim of FDV–related Assault. (Western Australian data was difficult to itemize according to intimate partner relationships at the printing of the report).
  • In the Northern Territory, there were five times as many female victims (3,351) of FDV–related Assault, as male victims (722). Females were seven times more likely (2,570 victims) than males (371 victims) to have experienced Assault victimisation within an intimate partner relationship. 
  • In the Australian Capital Territory, there were three times more female victims (510) of FDV – related Assault compared to male victims (187). Females were four times more likely (331 victims) than males (76 victims) to have experienced Assault victimisation within an intimate partner relationship.

Do you need support?

The following Domestic and Family Violence support services are available: