Book Recommendations

A Climate of Hope, Mick Pope and Claire Dawson, 2014

“Climate change is one of the most pressing moral issues of our time, and at the same time one of the most divisive. Australian authors, Claire Dawson and Mick Pope examine climate change from a Christian perspective, arguing that the science is well founded, and that Christianity is well placed to deal with the issue.”

 

A Climate of Justice, Mick Pope, 2017

Dr. Mick Pope examines justice issues through the lens of the Parable of the Good Samaritan, as well as within the context of climate change. Reflecting on the role climate change plays in addressing key issues of justice that currently concern Christians such as the refugee crises and asylum seekers as well as Aboriginal and Torres Strait justice.

 

Low Carbon and Loving It, Mark and Tom Delaney, 2018

"Low-carbon and Loving It is the story of the Delaneys, an ordinary Australian family who have made some extraordinary choices. Mark and his wife have lived much of their working lives in the slums of India, befriending neighbours who struggle to survive day to day. The Delaneys have continued this lifestyle of voluntary simplicity for two decades. Their experience has given them a very different perspective on life. It is these unique perspectives which allow father Mark, and co-author son Tom, to see afresh the climate crisis to which many in the West are blind. From their lives, they know a lower-carbon life is possible and even fulfilling, not only in India, but also in middle class Australia." E-book available to download free here

 

Bible and Ecology: Rediscovering the Community of Creation, Richard Bauckham 2010

Exegetical grounding for ecological responsibility from a leading UK theologian and biblical scholar.

 

Hope in an Age of Despair, Jonathan Moo and Robert White, 2013 

The evidence is clear: there is cause for concern about the impacts of human-induced climate change for us and all creation. But Christians bring a unique and distinctive understanding to God’s relationship with his world and our response to the future of all creation.

 

Active Hope: How to face the mess we’re in without going crazy, Joanna Macy and Chris Johnstone, 2012

Ecopsychologists with helpful insights and exercises for the mental health of ecological activists.

 

Merchants of Doubt: How a handful of scientists obscured the truth on issues from tobacco smoke to global warming, Naomi Oreskes & Erik M. Conway, 2010

Historical account of how a small group of individuals and organisations employed similar tactics across a range of issues to manufacture false doubt in the service of an anti-regulatory agenda. A documentary based on the book was made in 2015.

 

This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs the Climate, Naomi Klein, 2014

Understanding the political, economic and social factors that have led to decades of failure and what can be done about them.

 

Don't Even Think About It: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Ignore Climate Change, George Marshall, 2014

UK communications expert on the psychology of why it is so hard to think straight about climate.

 

How to Talk About Climate Change in a Way that Makes a Difference, Rebecca Huntley, 2020

Social scientist Rebecca Huntley’s book explores why it is so hard to talk about climate change and the need for “thousands – millions – of everyday conversations about the climate to enlarge the ranks of the concerned, engage the disengaged and persuade the cautious of the need for action”. In her book she also looks at the critical role the church plays in being a key climate leader and communicator as well as its role in helping people confront their grief and loss over climate change.

 

All We Can Save, Ayana Johnson and Katherine Wilkinson, 2020

Featuring essays from a diverse group of women who are at the forefront of the climate movement, including christian women working in this field Climate Scientist Katharine Hayhoe, Heather McTeer Toney and Mary Anne Hitt.

 

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